Policy in Plainer English

Putting Appreciation Into Practice

December 16, 2021 Helen Labun Season 4 Episode 6
Policy in Plainer English
Putting Appreciation Into Practice
Show Notes

In this season of Policy in Plainer English we're looking at skills food professionals use to understand how people experience flavor and what influences food choices - and what implications that might have for health professionals working with patients on diet change. The episodes build from each other, so if you haven't started at the beginning, consider pausing here and going back to "How We Experience Flavor".   

We interview two chefs, Dale Conoscenti and Leah Pryor, about how to take all the food appreciation skills we've covered in the last episodes, and apply them to shaping what goes on our dinner plates.

This episode mentions the 'sounds of water pouring' experiment, which NPR reported on in 2014, and then sound engineers got geeky about deconstructing.  A more famous experiment is the effect of sound on how we perceive chips as stale or fresh. . . less interesting audio for a podcast since that experiment focused on not hearing the crunch. The impact of sound on food design is not a fleeting concern. For example, this article from Atlas Obscura describes efforts to make airplane food taste "right" with the loud background noise of the jet engines.

In this episode I also note that we're skipping over a lot of information on scaling up flavor for commercial applications. For example, ice cream inclusions don't need to only work at 10-degrees Farenheit, they also have to withstand processing at -20-degrees because to get them to combine with the ice cream both the ice cream base and the inclusions need to be the same temperature and the ice cream is processed at -20.  If you want an amusing account of going from home kitchen experiment to commercial food production, Dan Pashman from The Sporkful has you covered with his Mission ImPASTAble series.

If you want to learn more about the Comprehensive Pain Program that Leah discusses, check out this link to the program - including its own short podcast episode "Can Food Fight Pain?".

This season of Policy in Plainer English is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $189,892.00 with 0 percentage financed with non governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

This podcast does not cost $189,892.00 to produce. No, there is a much larger Food Access in Health Care program of which this is one small element (the most fun element, but still small). Find out more at VTFoodInHealth.net.